Simon Alderton BSc, MSc, PhDSpace-Time Analyst











I am currently working at Lancaster University as a Senior Research Associate, employed as a space-time analyst in the Lancaster Environment Centre. I have always had a fundamental interest in how the world works, and how natural and anthropogenic adaptations or modifications of physical space through time (at various orders of magnitude), can affect that space both in terms of its natural makeup and socio-economic usage.

In my current research, I have developed the first agent-based model which investigates rHAT sleeping sickness transmission while modelling individual host and tsetse fly agents at a 1:1 scale. Although creating a disease model at such a fine scale is unusual, it has allowed the thorough investigation of interactions between the disease carrying tsetse fly vectors and potential hosts. For example, through the use of census data for a small area of Eastern Province, Zambia, along with a small sample of daily routines and remotely sensed spatial data, we have been able to analyse who is likely to be at risk (age, gender, ethnicity), what activities can be considered high risk (e.g. trips to what resources?) and which spatial locations connect vector and host.

During my postgraduate research I was lucky enough to consider the relationship between people and their environment across space and time in different settings, using very different methods. In contrast to my current research and that of my PhD, and while undertaking a research masters at Durham University, I designed and carried out a fieldwork and laboratory-based project focusing on coastal remediation from pollution. This research involved the collection of coastal flora and fauna, and chemically analysing the samples to assess how heavy metal contamination had changed in areas either side of a large coastal remediation project involving the removal of coal spoil from the local beaches. After presenting my findings to the stakeholders of the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership, the thesis was used in communication with the Coal Authority and the Environment Agency to consider what further research and action could be taken to mitigate this pollution.

Although the fundamental time-space elements remain, lab-based research has been replaced with computer simulation, physical remediation has been replaced with preventative measures for human health, and the developed world with the developing. As a result, through the course of my career so far I have developed a set of skills, ranging from the practical (the planning and carrying out of field and lab work), to the theoretical (the creation of novel computation models).

Outside of my own research, I have aided undergraduate teaching in GIS modules, was the treasurer for the SCCS2014 conference, and am currently secretary for the newly established Geospatial Data Science group at Lancaster University. In my spare time I have had the pleasure of competing and organising some successful teams at numerous regional and national pool and snooker tournaments, both inside and outside of university. I am also an avid rugby fan.

I am currently working at Lancaster University as a Senior Research Associate, employed as a space-time analyst in the Lancaster Environment Centre. I have always had a fundamental interest in how the world works, and how natural and anthropogenic adaptations or modifications of physical space through time (at various orders of magnitude), can affect that space both in terms of its natural makeup and socio-economic usage.



In my current research, I have developed the first agent-based model which investigates rHAT sleeping sickness transmission while modelling individual host and tsetse fly agents at a 1:1 scale. Although creating a disease model at such a fine scale is unusual, it has allowed the thorough investigation of interactions between the disease carrying tsetse fly vectors and potential hosts. For example, through the use of census data for a small area of Eastern Province, Zambia, along with a small sample of daily routines and remotely sensed spatial data, we have been able to analyse who is likely to be at risk (age, gender, ethnicity), what activities can be considered high risk (e.g. trips to what resources?) and which spatial locations connect vector and host.





During my postgraduate research I was lucky enough to consider the relationship between people and their environment across space and time in different settings, using very different methods. In contrast to my current research and that of my PhD, and while undertaking a research masters at Durham University, I designed and carried out a fieldwork and laboratory-based project focusing on coastal remediation from pollution. This research involved the collection of coastal flora and fauna, and chemically analysing the samples to assess how heavy metal contamination had changed in areas either side of a large coastal remediation project involving the removal of coal spoil from the local beaches. After presenting my findings to the stakeholders of the Durham Heritage Coast Partnership, the thesis was used in communication with the Coal Authority and the Environment Agency to consider what further research and action could be taken to mitigate this pollution.





Although the fundamental time-space elements remain, lab-based research has been replaced with computer simulation, physical remediation has been replaced with preventative measures for human health, and the developed world with the developing. As a result, through the course of my career so far I have developed a set of skills, ranging from the practical (the planning and carrying out of field and lab work), to the theoretical (the creation of novel computation models).

Outside of my own research, I have aided undergraduate teaching in GIS modules, was the treasurer for the SCCS2014 conference, and am currently secretary for the newly established Geospatial Data Science group at Lancaster University. In my spare time I have had the pleasure of competing and organising some successful teams at numerous regional and national pool and snooker tournaments, both inside and outside of university. I am also an avid rugby fan.