Simon Alderton BSc, MSc, PhDSpace-Time Analyst



Images of Easington Colliery beach before and after remediation (images from Durham Heritage Coast & Countryside Agency)





Heavy Metal Contamination Along the Coast of North-East England

MSc by Research Thesis

Summary:

  • The last century has seen the north east coast of England heavily aected by anthropogenic activities, none more notable than the coal mining industry, and the millions of tonnes of colliery waste estimated to have been dumped every year.
  • The purpose of this investigation was to consider the industrial forcing of the natural ecosystem which exists along the north east coast of England, and analyse the impacts of remediation in accelerating the recovery of the area from a state of economic exploitation, to natural habitat and environmental resource.
  • The concentrations of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Cd were determined in both the soft tissue and shell material of the blue mussel and common limpet (Patella vulgata) at several sites between Whitburn and the Tees estuary.
  • Although the investigation finds that the long term metal contamination of the coastline has decreased, a change in the spatial pattern of pollution is observed, manifested by an increase in metal concentrations at the Tees estuary site of Bran Sands.

This work was jointly funded by the Durham University Department of Geography and Durham heritage Coast Partnership



Heavy Metal Contamination Along the Coast of North-East England

MSc by Research Thesis

Images of Easington Colliery beach before and after remediation (images from Durham Heritage Coast & Countryside Agency)

Summary:

  • The last century has seen the north east coast of England heavily aected by anthropogenic activities, none more notable than the coal mining industry, and the millions of tonnes of colliery waste estimated to have been dumped every year.
  • The purpose of this investigation was to consider the industrial forcing of the natural ecosystem which exists along the north east coast of England, and analyse the impacts of remediation in accelerating the recovery of the area from a state of economic exploitation, to natural habitat and environmental resource.
  • The concentrations of Fe, Mn, Zn, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni and Cd were determined in both the soft tissue and shell material of the blue mussel and common limpet (Patella vulgata) at several sites between Whitburn and the Tees estuary.
  • Although the investigation finds that the long term metal contamination of the coastline has decreased, a change in the spatial pattern of pollution is observed, manifested by an increase in metal concentrations at the Tees estuary site of Bran Sands.

This work was jointly funded by the Durham University Department of Geography and Durham heritage Coast Partnership